Tag

Gender-Based Crimes

Nobel Women’s Initiative present – NASRIN

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Nobel Women’s Initiative presented a screening of the movie Nasrin followed by a panel. Human rights lawyer Amanda Ghahremani hosted the discussion with Nobel laureate Shirin Ebadi, activist Maryam Shafipour & filmmaker Jeff Kaufman about Women Human Rights Defenders’ movement and the movie Nasrin.

No Peace without Women’s Rights – Breaking the Cycle of Conflict in Afghanistan

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The webinaire “No Peace without Women’s Rights – Breaking the Cycle of Conflict in Afghanistan” was organized by the Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism and the Women Living Under Muslim Laws International Solidarity Network.

Professor Payam Akhavan gave the welcome word. The discussion was with Dr. Sima Samar and Dr. Sally Armstrong. Professor Homa Hoodfar (Concordia) gave remarks, and Professor Vrinda Narain (McGill) moderated.

Piercing the Corporate Veil: Multinational Corporate Accountability

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The conference “Piercing the Corporate Veil: Multinational Corporate Accountability” was held in Toronto and organized by the Osgoode Hall Law School.

Professor Valerie Oosterveld gave a presentation on “Holding Corporations Accountable for Gender-Based Violations in Conflict: Case Study of the Special Court for Sierra Leone”.

48th Annual Conference of the Canadian Council on International Law

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The members of the CPIJ will present a panel on October 25.

On June 3, 2019, after three years of hearing thousands of stories of systemic and structural violence, Canada’s National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls reached the “inescapable conclusion” that Canada as a state is responsible for an ongoing genocide of Indigenous peoples. The Inquiry found that this ongoing genocide constitutes a root cause of the violence that is currently being perpetrated against Indigenous women and girls. Colonial violence is ongoing, not just a legacy of the past.

The Inquiry’s final report is supplemented by a legal analysis on genocide, which specifically tackles this issue. It upholds that the true nature of genocide is distinct from the popular notions of it. Colonial genocide, i.e., genocide perpetrated in a colonial context, is a slow-moving process, unlike the traditional paradigms of genocide that are the Holocaust and the genocide in Rwanda. A gendered lens allows to adequately frame the elements of genocide, and sheds light on the gender-specific impacts it has on women and girls.

This panel will discuss the place of colonial genocide in international law in the wake of the National Inquiry’s works, and foster discussions on the active decolonization process that is needed in order to address Canada’s ongoing colonial genocide.

Chair
Amanda Ghahremani, International Lawyer & Consultant

Speakers
Catherine Savard, Canadian Partnership for International Justice
Fannie Lafontaine, Université Laval
Pamela Palmater, Ryerson University
Michèle Audette, National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

Look up the program.

Professor Valerie Oosterveld will also participate to a panel on “Perspectives on Gender: Sexual and Gender-Based Violence in International Humanitarian Law Today”.

CPIJ organizes a panel on colonialism as genocide at the 48th CCIL Conference

By | Upcoming Events

The Canadian Partnership for International Justice (CPIJ) hosts a panel at the 48th Annual Conference of the Canadian Council of International Law (CCIL). Titled “Colonialism as Genocide in Slow Motion: Is International Law diverse enough to address ongoing colonial genocide ”, this panel organized and financed by CPIJ will allow to discuss the place of colonial genocide in international law in the wake of the National Inquiry’s works, and foster discussions on the active decolonization process that is needed in order to address Canada’s ongoing colonial genocide.

The panel will be moderated by coresearcher Amanda Ghahremani, Simone de Beauvoir Institute, and will bring together Catherine Savard, CPIJ cocoordinator, Prof. Fannie Lafontaine, Université Laval, Prof. Pamela Palmater, Ryerson University and Michèle Audette, commissioner on the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

The full program of the 48thCCIL Conference is available online.

The Importance of Labelling in Transitional Justice: A Symposium

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The conference “The Importance of Labelling in Transitional Justice: A Symposium” was held in London (Canada) and organized by Western Law in collaboration with the Centre for Transitional Justice and Post-Conflict Reconstruction.

Professor Valerie Oosterveld gave a presentation on “Labelling of Sexual and Gender-Based Crimes in International Criminal Law: Who Decides?”.

The International Criminal Court and the Community of Nations

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The conference “The International Criminal Court and the Community of Nations” was held in Athens (Georgia) and organized by Dean Rusk International Law Centrer and the University of Georgia School of Law.

Professor Valerie Oosterveld gave a presentation on “Victims of Sexual and Gender-Based Violence as Stakeholders at the International Criminal Court”.

Black History Month

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The confenrece Black History Month took place in London (Canada) and was organized by the Congress of Black Woman of Canada – London Chapter.

Professor Valerie Oosterveld gave a presentation on “The Prohibition of Slavery in International Law: Still Relevant in 2019”.

Shirley Greenberg Lecture

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The Shirley Greenberg Lecture was held at the Faculty of law of the University of Ottawa.

Professor Penelope Simons with Melisa Handl gave a presentation on “Relations of Ruling: The United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, Resource Extraction and Violence against Women”.

Shirley Greenberg Lecture

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The Shirley Greenberg Lecture was held at the Faculty of Law of the University of Ottawa.

Professor Penelope Simons and Melisa Handl gave a presentation on “Relations of Ruling: The United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, Resource Extraction and Violence against Women”.