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Valérie Meehan

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Valérie Meehan is completing her Master degree on reconciliation between indigenous and non-indigenous people in Canada, at the School of Criminology in Montreal. Her research interests include law enforcement, transitional justice and indigenous issues. She is also teaching assistant of the summer school International Justice and Victim’s Rights directed by Professor Jo-Anne Wemmers. She is also working part-time at the Institut universitaire sur les dépendances, Montreal, as a research assistant on studies addressing harm reduction and services offered to people living with opioid addictions. Prior to starting her Master, she obtained a Bachelor degree with distinction in Security and Police Studies from the School of Criminology, Université de Montréal. She also worked several years for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police’s criminal intelligence analysis, focusing on national and international level investigations.

Participate to the International Justice and Victims’ Rights Summer School!

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The Canadian Partnership for International Justice organizes the International Justice and Victims’ Rights summer school, which will be held in Montreal from June 4 to June 9 2018. This event will bring together internationally renowed experts and human rights organizations in order to discuss and reflect on issues surrounding victims’ rights and international justice. The development of enforceable rights for victims, notably by the ICC, has created a new reality in which those who work with victims are increasingly obliged to understand the victims’s rights and needs. However, currently, a lot of law students and professionals lack training concerning victimology and victims’ rights. Suck a knowledge is essential to ensure evolving victims’ rights stay connected with victims’ needs and do not develop into empty legal concepts that are detached from victims’ needs.

This course serves to train and engage students and professionals in the areas of law, criminology, and related disciplines in key issues regarding the rights of victims of crime and abuse of power. Topics include reparation of victims of crimes against humanity, addressing the needs of victims of sexual violence in the courts, how courts handle victims who at the same time are perpetrators, as well as the place of victims in transitional justice.

This week long course consists of daily lectures by experts. Each day there are two lectures: one in the morning and one in the afternoon. Lectures last one hour and thirty minutes and are followed by a break and a discussion period. In addition, a visit to the Raoul Wallenberg Center and a meeting with a representative from the Canadian Center for International Justice are scheduled. Please note that the school is bilingual (French-English). Students are expected to be fluent in French or English and to have at least a passive understanding of the other language.

The week program is available here.

UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights Consultation on Gender and the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights

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November 2017 – CPIJ Researcher Penelope Simons (Faculty of Law, University of Ottawa) presented at a multi-stakeholder consultation on “The Gender Lens to the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights” on November 30, 2017, at the Palais des Nations in Geneva Switzerland. The consultation was convened by the UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights (UNWGBH). It brought together business and human rights scholars, representatives from non-governmental organizations, members of the UNWGBHR and OHCHR staff for a full day of discussions on how to bring considerations of gender to the implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights by businesses and States. Business activities can have differentiated impacts on the human rights of women and women often encounter discrimination and other obstacles in gaining access to effective remedies for business-related human rights abuses. The document related to this consultation and pictures of this day are available.

The Canadian Partnership for International Justice is attending the 16th Assembly of States Parties

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December 4, 2017 – For the second year in a row, the Canadian Partnership for International Justice is represented at the 16th Assembly of States Parties (ASP) to the International Criminal Court (ICC) by a delegation of practitioners, academics and students from various NGOs and academic institutions presented below.

Their attendance to the event of the year on international justice hosted by the UN on 4 to 14 December 2017 will allow them to contribute towards enhancing criminal remedies for victims of international crimes and finding solutions to outstanding issues that hamper the project envisioned in the Rome Statute.

This event is also an amazing opportunity for the Canadian Partnership to train a cohort of students who are educated, engaged and networked in international and transnational law. Through blogging and live twitting, our delegates will train and educate diverse Canadian audiences about the challenges, pitfalls and potential of the system of international justice, and about the priorities to improve the system. Thanks to their experience and knowledge, the delegations will contribute to enhancing Canada’s role as a global leader in the fight against impunity.

Follow the Partnership’s Twitter account and watch for our delegates’ posts on our partners’ platforms (IntLawGrrls, Quid Justitiae, Justice in Conflict, Blogue d’Avocats sans frontières Canada, PKI Global Justice Journal) to learn more about this year’s specific issues and to get news and updates.

Who is attending the ASP this year?

Academics

–       Fannie Lafontaine

–       Valerie Oosterveld

–       Darryl Robinson

–       Mark Kersten

–       Érick Sullivan

Practitioners

–       Amanda Ghahremani

–       Philippe Tremblay

–       Fergus Watt

Students

Jenny Poon

Jenny Poon is a third-year Ph.D. candidate at the Faculty of Law of the University of Western Ontario. Her research examines the norm of non-refoulement in international and European law and will involve a comparative analysis of the norm in United Kingdom and Germany.

Leah Gardner

Leah Gardner earned a law degree in both Common Law and Civil Law from McGill University in 2016. As part of her studies, she also completed the Intensive Semester in Aboriginal Lands, Resources and Governments at Osgoode Hall Law School. Before studying law, she worked as the Public Education Coordinator at a social justice non-profit in Montreal. At the Canadian Centre for International Justice, she led programs on topics like the Canadian extractive industry, international trade, and economic, social and cultural rights. As a human rights accompanier in Colombia, Leah worked with communities impacted by transnational mining. She later returned to Colombia, and also Panama, to complete two legal internships focused on mining law and corporate accountability. She currently sits on the board of the Justice and Corporate Accountability Project (JCAP) legal clinic. Leah holds a B.A. in International Development Studies from McGill University, and has experience working in both immigration and indigenous law in Canada.

Sophie Gagné

Having graduated in 2016 from an Integrated Bachelor in Public Affairs and International Relations (hon.) at Université Laval, Sophie is currently an L.L.M. and L.L.B. candidate, at Université Laval. Her L.L.M. research project, which she is completing under the supervision of Prof. Fannie Lafontaine and Julia Grignon, is about qualification of the end of armed conflicts by international criminal judges. She is part of the Canada Research Chair on International Criminal Justice and Human Rights, as well as of the Interdisciplinary Centre on Africa and Middle East. Since 2015, she has been working closely with the Clinique de droit international pénal et humanitaire, as well as with the Canadian Partnership for International Justice since its creation in 2016.

 

Geneviève Geneau

Geneviève Geneau is currently a Ph.D. student at Ottawa University under the supervision of Professor Muriel Paradelle. Her research focuses on criminalization in international criminal law of sexual violence committed against women in the framework of genocide. She is a research assistant at Université Laval’s Chaire de recherche en droit sur la diversité et la sécurité alimentaires and is a lecturer at Ottawa University.

 

 

 

 

Silviana Iulia Cocan

Silviana Cocan is a Ph.D student in international law at Laval University under joint supervision at Bordeaux University, in France. She is currently writing a thesis on the dialogue between jurisdictions and quasi-jurisdictions protecting human rights. More specifically, she is studying judicial dialogue in direct relation with the prohibition of torture and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment and punishment. Her research fields are public international law, human rights law, international humanitarian law and international criminal law. Silviana is also participating as a student at Université Laval’s International Criminal and Humanitarian Law Clinic.

Catherine Savard

Catherine Savard is currently completing her bachelor in Law at Université Laval. She is also the assistant coordinator for the Canadian Partnership for International Justice. During her degree, she completed a year of schooling at Åbo Akademi University’s Institute for Human Rights, in Finland. Back at Université Laval, she involved in the International Criminal and Humanitarian Law Clinic and realized research mandates, including for the Special Tribunal for Lebanon.

Nicole Tuczynski

Nicole Tuczynski is a current LL.M (Common Law) student at the University of Ottawa. She also enjoys working in the field of politics on Parliament Hill for a M.P, a position that she has held for the past two years. Her research interests and passion revolve around both International Criminal Law and Canadian Health Law and Policy. Her specific research focus is currently on the International Criminal Court and one of the specific aims of the institution – that being an end to impunity for perpetrators who have committed genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Nicole holds a M.A. in Political Science, with a Collaboration in Transitional Justice and Post-Conflict Reconstruction, and a B.A. Honours Specialization Degree in Political Science, both from Western University. Her previous Master’s Major Research Paper also focused on international justice by way of studying the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and assessing its mandate.

Annika Weikinnis

Annika Weikinnis is currently enrolled in the Graduate Studies in Law program at the University of Ottawa and conducts research in the field of international criminal law, in particular the involvement of transnational corporations in international crimes. She holds a Master’s degree in Politics and International Relations from the University of Aberdeen and a Master’s degree in Law and Politics of International Security from the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. Attending the ASP16 is an invaluable experience for her, academically and professionally, and she hopes to gain further insights in the organisation, processes and issues concerning the ICC.

Isabelle Jacovella Rémillard

Isabelle oversees the Community Engagement with International Justice project at the Canadian Centre for International Justice (CCIJ), a project which uses multimedia to highlight CCIJ’s clients’ various access to justice efforts. She is also responsible for coordinating CCIJ’s digital outreach and organising legal education workshops with affected communities. She earned her Bachelor’s degree in Conflict Studies and Human Rights at the University of Ottawa and her double degree in civil law and common law at McGill University. She also holds a professional certificate in Disaster and Humanitarian Response from the McGill Humanitarian Studies Initiative. Isabelle’s research interests include issues of sexual violence in times of war, and the scope of protection of child soldiers under IHL.

Maxime Mariage

Maxime is currently completing a specialized post-graduate diploma at Université Laval and earned a master in international relations and international journalism. He studied in Beijing and interned in international organizations, notably at the Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect and at Crisis Action in New York. He also worked for Le Soleil newspaper in Dakar, Senegal. He is specializing in international law and cultural rights and possesses a huge experience in legal translation.